6 Reasons to Teach Your Kids to Use a Bidet as Early as Possible

The habits you teach your kids early on will stick with them throughout their adult lives. For example, they’ll probably wipe themselves with toilet paper forever, just as they were taught. The same is true for using a bidet.

Bathroom habits solidify early. If you don’t teach your kids how to use a bidet at a young age, it might seem strange to them as an adult, and they might not be willing to try it out. In that case, your kids will miss out on one of the most hygienic tools a bathroom can have.

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If you haven’t taught your kids how to use a bidet yet, here are 6 reasons to start teaching them today.

1. A bidet will prevent your kids from spreading bacteria

Once your kids learn how to use the bidet, you’ll have less bacteria around the house. Specifically, a bidet will prevent kids from spreading feces through the house after getting it on their hands and clothes while wiping.

You’d be horrified if you knew just how much feces is spread all over your house. Research studies have determined that homes are full of feces on walls, countertops, keyboards, phones, appliances, coffee cups, silverware, sponges, and other surfaces that are touched regularly.

Kids usually spread more bacteria around than adults. When your kids use a bidet, there will be one less source for gross bacteria to be spread around your home.

2. It’s not hard or complicated to use

If you’ve never used a bidet, it might seem complicated or hard for kids to learn. If adults have to learn, it must be hard for kids, right? Not so much. Many kids in Europe and Japan grow up using a bidet from an early age.

It’s not hard to learn how to use a bidet. While wall-mounted bidets can be a little challenging, a toilet seat bidet is effortless. All you do is push the button that sprays the water. When you’re done, you can use the built-in dryer (if you have one) or use a bidet wipe to dry off.

Teaching your kids how to use a toilet seat bidet is actually easier (and cleaner) than teaching them how to wipe.

3. Your kids will grow up being clean

Kids who get used to using a bidet at an early age will be cleaner as adults when they continue using a bidet.

There’s no guarantee your kids will continue using a bidet, but the chances are pretty high. Once a bidet becomes a habit, they’ll feel gross when confronted with toilet paper as their only option. That’s a good thing!

4. Your kids won’t have itchy butts

Kids are notorious for not wiping thoroughly after using the toilet. When kids don’t wipe thoroughly, they get itchy bottoms. The truth is, it’s not their fault – they can never wipe thoroughly with dry toilet paper. Even wet wipes aren’t good enough.

There are only two things that will get their bottoms clean: a shower and a bidet. It’s not practical to ask your kids to take a shower after using the toilet, so a bidet is the best choice.

5. Your kids will be less likely to develop anal fissures and UTIs

Nobody wants to get urinary tract infections (UTI) or anal fissures, but it happens often. Wiping with dry toilet paper is a major culprit for both.

Anal fissures (tears in the rectal tissue) can develop from over wiping or wiping too hard. UTIs can happen when girls wipe from back to front and bring bacteria into their urinary tract.

When your kids use a stream of water to clean themselves, they won’t get anal fissures or UTIs from wiping.

5. A bidet can use warm water

With a bidet toilet seat attachment, you can have warm water. That’s a relief, because you’d probably have a hard time getting your kids to spray themselves with cold water.

6. The spray power is adjustable

With just about any bidet, you can control the spray power. For kids, that’s important. They will probably need a lighter spray. Most bidets offer several spray settings that will suit your needs as well as theirs.

Teach your kids to use a bidet No matter how old they are, start teaching your kids how to use a bidet. Using a bidet is one of the best life skills a kid can learn.

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